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When my husband Christopher first came up with the wacky fusion idea of making Teriyaki Haggis about 10 years ago for a Burns night supper, I was sceptical to say the least, and I even made a backup dish in case people didn’t like it. But it was a huge success, and it’s really healthy too. Our whole family absolutely love it.

Haggis is a super nutritious “ready meal” that has fed the Scots for centuries. It contains a few simple good honest ingredients which are usually lamb, beef fat, oats and spices with no modern flavour enhancers or preservatives. A haggis naturally contains lots of iron, magnesium, selenium, calcium, zinc, and copper which are all important for energy through the winter months. It is very filling so you will be less likely to need to snack after a feast of haggis.

Vegetarian haggis is delicious too and again made from good quality fresh ingredients including vegetables, mushrooms, pulses, oats, onions and seeds and again no ultra-processed ingredients.

Christopher writes: Teriyaki Haggis is ridiculously simple at its most basic… you just drizzle Teriyaki sauce on Haggis (instead of whisky!). But I like to pimp things up a bit, especially for the visual effect if you are having people round, as Haggis is a bit of an amorphous mess, and Neeps & Tatties is not much better, but it does bring a splash of colour.

Here are the details...
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
people 10 minutes
Cook Time
25 minutes
Servings Prep Time
people 10 minutes
Cook Time
25 minutes
Here are the details...
Print Recipe
Servings Prep Time
people 10 minutes
Cook Time
25 minutes
Servings Prep Time
people 10 minutes
Cook Time
25 minutes
Ingredients
Neeps & Tatties
Haggis
  • 1000 g Haggis (Macsween make traditional, vegetarian and gluten-free)
  • Teriyaki Sauce (Waitrose Cooks' Ingredients is more syrupy than Kikkoman)
  • 2 Spring onions (Optional)
  • Parseley (Optional, to decorate)
Units
Instructions
  1. Peel and dice the swede and potato. You may want to dice the swede smaller, as otherwise it cooks a little slower than the potato. I was taught always to put one potato in with a swede, to give it a better consistency, while still retaining the yellow colour and swede flavour. Boil them until they are soft, which is about 20 minutes.
  2. You can just take the haggis and cook it according to the instructions, but for dinners, I like to slice it into oversized coins, remove the casing and microwave them so they retain that shape for visual effect. Either way, while the swede and potato are boiling, get the haggis cooked.
  3. This is also a good time to prepare the garnish by slicing the spring onions and preparing some sprigs of parsley if you are using them. The tartness of the onions balance the richness of the haggis and teriyaki quite well, it you like raw onions.
  4. When the swede and potato are ready, you can drain and mash them. Some people like to whizz them to a puree, but I don't think Rob Roy would approve. I think tatties & neeps should still have just a little roughness in the consistency. I don't use anything other than my mother's 50-year old potato masher, and it takes a little while to get right.
  5. Do not add the butter and artichoke until you are happy with the consistency, as I find it will make your masher less effective, as lumps escape round the side of the masher if it's all too slippery!
  6. Finally, add salt and pepper to taste. On its own, this may still taste as if your fussy kids will reject it, but the real magic comes when you mix in the haggis and teriyaki.
  7. For each plate, you can arrange the haggis and neeps & tatties as you wish. Drizzle plenty of teriyaki sauce over the haggis, and make sure some escapes onto the plate for effect. Then top with your garnishes!
Recipe Notes
  • Macsweens make vegan and gluten-free haggis. They do not contain liver, so they are safe for pregnancy.
  • You can get sugar, soya and gluten-free vegan teriyaki sauce made from coconut here.
  • Vegans can substitute vegan spread like Naturili for butter.
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